Cervical Stenosis

Cervical stenosis is a condition in which the bones that make up the cervical spine tighten around the spinal cord, narrowing the cushioning space between them and putting too much pressure on the spinal cord. It can be caused by:

  • The natural wear and tear of aging
  • Narrowing since birth
  • Arthritis

Symptoms

Cervical stenosis causes a variety of uncomfortable symptoms, including:

  • Pain in the back, neck, legs, or bottom
  • Weakness, tingling or numbness in the shoulders, arm, and legs

Treatment

Treatment for cervical stenosis generally depends on the severity of the neck pain. If non-surgical treatments, including anti-inflammatory or pain medications, steroid injections, or physical therapy, do not relieve the pain, surgery may be an option. The orthopedic surgeons at MedStar Orthopaedic Institute are extensively trained in the most advanced and innovative surgical procedures to treat cervical stenosis.

  • Laminectomy, or decompression, removes the bones or ligaments that press on the nerves or spinal cord.
  • Cervical fusion - unites vertebrae together to help stabilize the spine.

Learn more about treatment for cervical stenosis.

For more information or to schedule an appointment with a back, neck, and spine specialist, please call:

877-34-ORTHO



Spinal Fractures

The spinal vertebrae are spongier and less dense than the other bones in your body in order to accommodate movements like bending and twisting.  This also means they are more vulnerable to fracture. A spinal fracture occurs when one of the bones in the spinal column breaks. This type of fracture is also known as a vertebral compression fracture because the bone that breaks (the vertebral body) often cracks and collapses, becoming compressed.

Causes

  • Certain diseases, such as osteoporosis or cancer, are known to cause loss of bone mass and changes in bone structure, making them brittle and weak.
  • Genetic factors and certain lifestyles, such as a low calcium diet, can also damage bone.
  • Over time, the vertebral bodies can become so weak that normal activities such as bending over or lifting a bag of groceries can cause a spinal fracture.

Symptoms

Although you can't feel your bones getting weaker, you might feel a spinal fracture when it occurs. Sudden and severe back pain, out of proportion to the activity at hand, is a hallmark sign of a spinal fracture. For most of us, the thought of breaking a bone during normal, non-strenuous activity is difficult to imagine. Many patients mistakenly attribute the pain of a spinal fracture to a muscle strain or bad back. Further complicating the issue is that spinal fractures often occur with only mild, or even indiscernible, back pain.

  • Symptoms commonly associated with spinal fractures that are caused by osteoporosis or cancer include:
  • Sudden onset of back pain, unrelated or out of proportion to activity
  • Back pain worsens with sitting or standing
  • Back pain often relieved by lying down

Treatment

Two types of minimally invasive procedures are available to provide relief from the pain of a vertebral fracture: vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty.

For more information or to schedule an appointment with a back, neck, and spine specialist, please call:

877-34-ORTHO



Herniated Disc

Between your spinal bones (vertebrae) are pads of cartilage called discs. Natural use or strain can cause a disc to rupture (leak) or slip out of place (herniate). When a disc weakens, parts of it can shift and put pressure on a nerve or even the spinal cord. It may result in back pain, numbness, tingling, or weakness. A variety of factors reduces the amount of water in the discs, making them weaker and more likely to get injured. These include:

  • Natural aging process
  • Being overweight
  • Picking up heavy objects
  • Smoking

Symptoms

  • Pain in the back or neck
  • Burning sensation
  • Arm and/or leg weakness
  • Numbness
  • Tingling, like your arm or leg "fell asleep"
  • Bladder control problems

Treatment

Most people suffering from back pain from a herniated disc respond well to non-surgical treatment, which includes:

  • Resting the back
  • Taking prescription or over-the-counter anti-inflammatory or pain medications
  • Doing physical therapy, including applying heat or ice, massage, and exercises to strengthen the back

If non-surgical treatment does not relieve your pain, you may need surgery. MedStar Health orthopedic surgeons will work with you to determine the least invasive and most effective surgical option, which include traditional open, minimally invasive, and endoscopic discectomy.

For more information or to schedule an appointment with a back, neck, and spine specialist, please call:

877-34-ORTHO



Spondylolisthesis

Spondylolisthesis develops when an injury or deformity pushes one or more spinal vertebrae out of place, which then put pressure on the spinal cord and/or nearby nerves. The two common types of spondylolisthesis are:

  • Degenerative spondylolisthesis: The vertebrae lose flexibility and strength (either from natural aging or arthritis) and shrink, swell, and move out of place.
  • Spondylotic spondylolisthesis: A break in a lower back bone can cause a vertebra to move out of place.

Symptoms

Some people have spondylolisthesis for many years and do not realize it until the slipped vertebra starts to affect nearby nerves. Then, symptoms can include:

  • Leg pain
  • Lower back pain
  • Burning sensation or numbness in the legs
  • Weakness in the legs

Treatment

Your orthopedic team will first try to treat the pain and discomfort of spondylolisthesis with non-surgical treatment. Treatment options aside from surgery may include:

  • Prescription and over-the-counter anti-inflammatory or pain medications
  • Injections of steroids or anti-inflammatory medications
  • Physical therapy, including exercises to strengthen the back and abdominal muscles

If non-surgical treatment does not relieve the symptoms within six months, surgery may be necessary. The orthopedic surgeons at MedStar Health have extensive training in advanced and innovative surgical procedures to treat spondylolisthesis, including:

  • Laminectomy, or decompression, removes the bones or ligaments that press on the nerves or spinal cord.
  • Spinal fusion unites vertebrae together to help stabilize the spine.

For more information or to schedule an appointment with a back, neck, and spine specialist, please call:

877-34-ORTHO



Spinal Tumors

Tumors that grow on or near the bones of the spine or around the spinal cord can disrupt the line of communication between the spinal cord and the brain. Spinal tumors can originate in the spine, or spread to the spine from another part of the body.

Symptoms

A spinal tumor can cause different kinds of symptoms, depending on where it is located and what type of tumor it is. Generally, spinal tumor symptoms can include:

  • Back pain
  • Strange feeling, either of coldness or numbness, in the legs or hands
  • Incontinence
  • Muscle discomfort, including weakness and cramping

Treatment

Treatment for a spinal tumor aims to remove or shrink the tumor and prevent it from damaging the spinal cord. The spine surgeons at MedStar Health will work with you and your family to determine the most effective treatment options for you. In many cases, we recommend surgery to remove the as much of the tumor as possible. Our orthopedic surgeons have training and expertise in the most advanced microscopic and minimally invasive spinal surgeries. In other cases, we may recommend non-surgical options, including:

  • Monitoring tumor growth
  • Medication, such as corticosteroids, to ease any swelling and inflammation
  • Radiation
  • Chemotherapy

For more information or to schedule an appointment with a back, neck, and spine specialist, please call:

877-34-ORTHO



Spinal Stenosis

Spinal stenosis is a condition in which the bones that make up the spine tighten around the spinal cord, reducing the cushioning space between them and putting too much pressure on the spinal cord. It can be caused by:

  • The natural wear and tear of aging
  • Back problems since birth
  • Arthritis

Symptoms

Spinal stenosis causes a variety of uncomfortable symptoms, including:

  • Pain in the back, neck, legs, or bottom
  • Burning sensation or numbness in the legs
  • Weakness in the legs

Treatment

Treatment for spinal stenosis generally depends on the severity of the back pain. If non-surgical treatments, including anti-inflammatory or pain medications, steroid injections, or physical therapy, do not relieve the pain, surgery may be an option. The orthopedic surgeons at MedStar Health are extensively trained in the most advanced and innovative surgical procedures to treat spinal stenosis.

  • Laminectomy, or decompression, removes the bones or ligaments that press on the nerves or spinal cord.
  • Spinal fusion unites vertebrae together to help stabilize the spine.

For more information or to schedule an appointment with a back, neck, and spine specialist, please call:

877-34-ORTHO



Scoliosis & Spinal Deformities

A healthy spine curves slightly, but some conditions cause the spine to curve dramatically. These conditions include:

  • Scoliosis, which causes the spine to curve in the shape of a C or an S. Scoliosis generally affects children, especially girls, but it can also develop in adults.
  • Kyphosis, which causes your spine to curve so much that your body is hunched and rounded. Postural kyphosis results from bad posture and slouching and is often less severe. Other types of kyphosis can cause deformities to individual vertebrae and more severe rounding.

Symptoms

Scoliosis and kyphosis also cause:

  • Lopsided hips, shoulders, and waist
  • Protruding shoulder blades
  • Inability to stand straight
  • Bulge or bump on the back

Treatment

The team of expert orthopedic spine surgeons at MedStar Health spends time with all patients and their families explaining conditions and treatment options thoroughly. Whenever appropriate, we also encourage families to consider alternatives to surgery, including physical therapy and bracing. Our doctors make recommendations based on the extent of the spine curvature, the amount of pain, and age. A typical non-surgical treatment option for scoliosis and kyphosis is wearing a brace. This helps keep the curvature from getting worse. In some cases, non-surgical treatment options do not relieve the back pain and other symptoms of spinal deformities. In those cases, we will recommend surgery. Our expert team of orthopedic surgeons will work with you and your family to determine the most effective and advanced surgical options.  Surgery to treat spinal deformities serves to straighten the spine and/or release the pressure on spinal nerves. This often requires uniting the vertebrae using special implants to keep the spine together.

Adolescent Scoliosis

If the spine grows unnaturally, this curvature can affect a person's posture for life. If your pediatrician has recommended you see an orthopaedist who specializes in scoliosis, contact a MedStar Health fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeon with expertise in this area to perform this evaluation. We use an innovative approach to predict the development of scoliosis in children who are adolescent or pre-adolescent.

SCOLISCORE™ AIS Prognostic Test

The SCOLISCORE™ AIS Prognostic test, approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration after a series of clinical trials, is a way to determine who is at risk for curve progression. Using a simple saliva test, the lab can determine, using a DNA footprint, whether your child's curve needs treatment. This test is exciting for doctors—because before SCOLIiSCORE, the majority of children and teenagers at risk for scoliosis used to have an X-ray every six months to determine the growth and development of their curvature. For the overwhelming majority of children, their curvature will not progress, but it was impossible to know this before SCOLISCORE. Now 60-70 percent of these children know, with certainty, they will not develop scoliosis; therefore, they won't need to be exposed to X-rays every six months.

Call Us Today

For more information or to schedule an appointment with a back, neck, and spine specialist, please call:

877-34-ORTHO



Foot and Ankle Pain – DRAFT

foot pain

At our foot and ankle center, our fellowship-trained orthopedic specialists believe that if you are suffering from extreme ankle and foot pain or discomfort in your heel, you don’t need to live with it.

In fact, the more difficult and painful your foot and ankle issues are, the more you need to see our experts, especially if other treatments have failed. From big toe and arch pain to severe ankle arthritis, our foot and ankle specialists are experienced in diagnosing and treating a wide range of foot and ankle conditions.

Our newly renovated MedStar Orthopaedic Institute uses updated diagnostic imaging tools with dedicated foot and ankle-specific CT and x-ray. Better images lead to better diagnoses, which lead to better treatment.

Not sure what you need or who to see? Call us at 877-34-ORTHO and our helpful call center associates will guide you.

Conditions that cause foot and ankle pain:

Call Us Today

For more information or to schedule an appointment with a foot and ankle specialist, please call:

877-34-ORTHO




Achilles Tendon Tear (Rupture)

The Achilles tendon is the largest tendon in the body and connects your calf muscles to your heel bone. It is used when you walk, run, and jump. Although it is strong, the Achilles tendon may tear, or separate, causing swelling and severe pain in the back of your ankle. You may even hear a pop or snap when the tendon tears. There are a variety of nonsurgical and surgical options for repairing an Achilles tear. Your foot and ankle specialist will recommend treatment based on the severity of your injury. Learn more about Achilles tendon rupture repair.

 

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Ankle Arthritis

Ankle arthritis occurs when tissue that surrounds the joint in your ankle becomes inflamed. As ankle arthritis worsens, the cartilage wears down, causing the end of the ankle bones to rub against each other. This can cause debilitating ankle pain, swelling, and stiffness, making it difficult to stand, walk, or jump.

Severe ankle arthritis can restrict your movement and limit your quality of life. However, with proper care, you can slow down arthritis and relieve painful symptoms. Our foot and ankle doctors will tailor a treatment plan to your needs, using the least invasive options, when possible. Learn more about ankle arthritis treatment.

 

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Ankle Fractures

An ankle fracture is a partial or complete break in one of your ankle bones. Fractures often occur as a result of trauma such as a fall, blow, or severe twist. This can cause uncomfortable symptoms, including:

  • Immediate and severe ankle pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising and tenderness
  • Decreased range of motion
  • Difficulty walking or putting weight on the injured ankle
  • A lump or visible deformity

If you think you have a fractured ankle, it is important to have an x-ray. The type of treatment you need may vary based on where the bone is broken and the severity of the break. Learn more about ankle fracture treatment.

 

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Ankle Sprains

An ankle sprain occurs when the ankle stretches or twists in an unnatural motion. Most commonly, ankle sprains occur during exercise or sports when the foot is awkwardly planted or is stepped on by another athlete. When this happens, you may experience bruising, swelling, itching, tenderness, and/or sharp pain in your heel and ankle. Learn more about ankle sprain treatment.

 

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Bunions and Big Toe Pain

A bunion is an inflamed bump that forms at the base of the big toe where it joins with the foot. A bunion results from the big toe pushing against the neighboring toe, pushing the big toe bone out of alignment. Bunions often develop as a result of genetics or a medical condition, such as arthritis in your feet. Symptoms may include:

  • Burning pain in you big toe
  • Inflammation
  • Numbness

Bunions tend to slowly worsen over time and while wearing tight shoes, so it is important to seek bunion treatment. If they become too severe, bunions can make it difficult to walk without discomfort. They may also increase the risk of developing arthritis and/or bursitis. When considering treatment, some of our minimally invasive bunion surgery options may allow you to bear weight on your foot immediately after surgery. Ask our foot and ankle physicians if this option is right for you. Learn more about bunion treatment.

 

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Flatfoot

You may have flatfoot if you have low arches or no arches in your feet. Flexible flatfoot is the most common type of flatfoot, which means your arch returns when there is no pressure on the foot. Symptoms may include:

  • Heel pain or discomfort in the arch and ankle
  • Rolled-in ankle
  • Pain along the shin bone
  • General aching in the foot or leg
  • Lower back, hip, or knee pain

It’s important to seek flatfoot treatment to prevent the development of bunions or hammertoe. Nonsurgical treatment may include rest, shoe inserts, braces, or physical therapy. For severe cases of flatfoot, surgery may be necessary to restore the arches in your feet and reduce your foot pain. Learn more about flatfoot treatment.

 

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Foot Arthritis

The foot contains more than 30 joints, making foot arthritis common, especially in adults over the age of 50. Foot arthritis occurs when the tissue surrounding the joints in the toes or feet becomes inflamed. The result is often excruciating pain, stiffness, and swelling, making it difficult to walk normally.

Foot arthritis or toe arthritis may lead to foot deformities, such as hammertoe. Foot or toe arthritis could also result in pain in the ball of the foot. Learn more about foot arthritis treatment.

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Foot Fractures

A foot fracture, or break, may occur in any of the 26 bones found in the foot as a result of trauma or injury. Immediate and severe pain, swelling, bruising, or difficulty walking may be signs of a fracture. Because a severe sprain can often mask the symptoms of a fracture, you should be sure to see a foot specialist if you have a foot injury. Learn more about foot fracture treatment.

 

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Hammertoe

A hammertoe is a toe deformity that causes the second, third, or fourth toes to bend upward in the middle, resembling a hammer. Hammertoe symptoms may include extreme toe pain or irritation, inflammation, or a buildup of skin called calluses or corns on top of the toe. Hammertoe often occurs alongside other toe problems and it worsens over time. Learn more about hammertoe treatment.

 

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High Arches

Everyone has a slight curve between the heel and the ball of the foot, but for some people, an unusually high arch can cause pain and other foot issues. For example, high arches can cause plantar fasciitis, foot and ankle instability, or hammertoe. If you have painfully high arches, it’s a good idea to talk to one of our foot and ankle doctors about a treatment plan that’s right for you. Learn more about high arch treatment.

 

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Morton’s Neuroma

Morton’s neuroma is a growth of nerve tissues often found between the third and fourth toes. Sometimes referred to as a “pinched nerve,” Morton’s neuroma may result in a burning or sharp pain in the ball of your foot and toes while walking. You may also experience tingling or numbness between your toes and in the ball of your foot.

A neuroma may develop as a result of trauma, repeated stress, uncomfortable footwear, or a foot deformity, such as flatfoot. Most commonly found in women who wear high-heeled shoes, neuromas can worsen over time. Diagnosing and treating neuroma early can help to avoid surgery. Learn more about Morton's neuroma treatment.

 

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Neuromuscular Disorders

Neuromuscular disorders include a variety of medical conditions that impact the muscles and nerves in the body, including your feet and ankles. And, symptoms such as cramps, pain and tingling sensations may worsen over time.

For example, Charcot Marie Tooth disease is a hereditary condition that may result in high arch feet and hammertoes or numbness and pain in the feet. Other neuromuscular disorders that affect the feet may include stroke or cerebral palsy. While there’s no cure, our experienced foot and ankle specialists will work with you to develop a treatment plan that may include a combination of physical therapy, shoe inserts (orthotics), or medication. Learn more about neuromuscular disorder treatments.

 

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Ankle Instability

Ankle instability is when the ankles becomes too weak to be reliable while walking. Some patients describe it as feeling like their ankle “gives out” or is fragile, flimsy, or wobbly. Many times, ankle instability is caused by a condition called osteochondral lesion of the talus. Osteochondral lesions of the talus are injuries to the bottom bone of the ankle joint that involve both the bone and the overlying cartilage. They can occur after a traumatic injury, such as a fracture or sprain, or as a result of repeated trauma. Common symptoms include persistent pain, swelling, and/or a feeling of instability in the ankle.

If you have ankle instability, your doctor may advise you to restrict putting weight on your ankle. In other cases, you may need surgery to restore the normal shape and function of your ankle. Learn more about ankle instability treatment.

 

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Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis occurs when the tissue on the bottom of the foot becomes inflamed. This tissue connects the heel bone to the toes, helping to absorb shock as you walk. However, too much pressure can cause damage. Plantar fasciitis is a common cause of severe heel pain, especially for runners. Age, obesity, and certain types of exercise may increase your risk of developing chronic plantar fasciitis.

In most cases, nonsurgical treatment can resolve severe heel and ankle pain caused by severe plantar fasciitis. Your foot and ankle physician may recommend a combination of physical therapy, medication, or night splints to help minimize inflammation and pain. Learn more about plantar fasciitis treatment.

 

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Sports Injuries in the Foot and Ankle

Nearly 25 percent of athletic injuries are related to the foot and ankle, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Athletes that play sports involving running and jumping are at a higher risk for experiencing foot and ankle injuries. Sports injuries could include plantar fasciitis, foot and ankle sprains or fractures, and Morton’s neuroma, among others.

Our foot and ankle specialists are uniquely trained to care for a wide range of sports injuries. In fact, many of the area’s top sports teams and colleges trust us to care for their athletes, including the Baltimore Ravens, Baltimore Orioles, and the Baltimore Blast.

Learn more about foot treatments and foot surgery.

Learn more about ankle treatments and ankle surgery.

 

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Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Similar to carpal tunnel syndrome in the wrist, tarsal tunnel syndrome occurs when the tarsal tunnel swells. The tunnel consists of tendons, veins, and arteries, leaving little room for expansion. This causes the tibial nerve to compress, resulting in severe pain, burning, and tingling along the inside of the ankle, heel, arch, and sole. Symptoms tend to increase as the day progresses and are usually worsened with prolonged standing or increased activity, such as walking or exercise. Learn more about tarsal tunnel syndrome treatment.

 

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ACL Injury

basketball-feet-800x366

An ACL injury affects one of the four main ligaments that connect the femur (thighbone) to the tibia (shinbone).  The ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) is fibrous, like a rope and along with the other ligaments, holds the knee together, and provides rotational stability. 

An ACL injury usually happens during some kind of physical activity, sports or exercise. It results from a quick change of direction in forward motion, a twisting or pivoting motion, or sudden stops where the foot and lower leg are planted and the top part of the knee keeps moving forward, following the law of inertia, causing the ligament to tear either partially or completely. It is a very common sports injury both for competitive athletes and those involved in exercise or recreation sports.

Symptoms of an ACL injury include intense pain and swelling of the knee, loss of range of motion and weakness with weight-bearing on the leg. Sometimes a “pop” sound is heard when the ligament tears.

For a competitive athlete, a tear in the anterior cruciate ligament requires surgery to repair the tear, if they wish to return to their sport.  Non-competitive, yet active people may also choose to have the tear surgically repaired, so they can continue to be as active as they were before the tear. It is possible to rehabilitate the knee and not have surgery, but activity may be somewhat limited.

To repair of an ACL injury that involves a tear, the surgeon removes the damaged ACL and replaces it with a tissue graft, usually from either the patellar (knee) tendon or a hamstring tendon. 

Learn more about ACL surgery and repair.

For more information or to schedule an appointment with an knee specialist, please call our scheduling line:

877-34ORTHO (67846)

Meet the Team

Our Locations

MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center
9000 Franklin Square Drive
Baltimore, MD 21237

MedStar Good Samaritan Hospital
5601 Loch Raven Boulevard
Baltimore, MD 21239

MedStar Harbor Hospital
2900 S. Hanover Street
Baltimore, MD 21225

MedStar Union Memorial Hospital
3333 N. Calvert Street, Suite 400
Baltimore, MD 21218

Neck Pain

The spine program at MedStar Orthopaedic Institute is well-respected in the central Maryland and Washington regions for the diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of neck pain and spine disorders. Our program brings together a variety of skilled specialists with experience in a wide range of spinal conditions, including some of the most complex conditions seen in orthopedic medicine. Our multidisciplinary team includes orthopedic spine surgeons, neurosurgeons, physiatrists (rehabilitative medicine physicians), nursing staff, physical and occupational therapists, radiologists, and an interventional pain management team—and we put all our expertise to work for you, to relieve your neck pain and get you back to your active life. 

What is Neck Pain?

The spine consists of bones (vertebrae) separated by soft cushions (discs). Nerves that travel from the brain to the rest of the body all pass through the spine. When pressure from spinal vertebrae is applied to nerves, pain, numbness, tingling, or weakness can occur. These sensations are not always relegated to the back or spine as back pain; rather, they can occur in many areas of the body, depending on what nerves are pressed, where they originate in the spine, and where they travel to.

No matter how sharp, or how long it lasts, neck pain often limits our ability to feel active and productive. The top priority for anyone suffering from back pain is simply to eliminate the pain. Common causes of back pain include

  • Poor posture, especially while using a computer or watching television
  • Quickly twisting or moving your head
  • Sleeping in a bad position

Arm and leg pain can arise from neck issues or injuries. Experiencing serious pain in our arms and legs can make even the simplest tasks feel very difficult.

Pain is identified two different ways: acute and chronic. Most people with back or neck injuries suffer from acute pain, which lasts four to six weeks and can stop without medical treatment. Chronic pain lasts for more than three months and requires medical treatment. 

Neck Pain Diagnosis

When you arrive at a MedStar Orthopaedic Institute's facility with neck pain, our orthopedic teams will thoroughly review your medical history and symptoms and may perform a range of physical and laboratory examinations—all with the goal of making the most accurate diagnosis so we can give you the best treatment. The most common screenings to pinpoint the source of your pain or associated pain includes the following:

  • X-rays show the alignment of your bones and whether you have a degenerative joint disease or possible tumors.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computerized tomography (CT) scans can reveal herniated discs or problems with muscles, cartilage, ligaments, tendons, or blood vessels.
  • Myelography uses dye to show areas where your spinal cord may be getting pinched by the vertebrae in your back.
  • Bone scans detect bone tumors or compression fractures caused by osteoporosis.
  • Electrodiagnostic studies can confirm nerve compression caused by herniated discs or spinal stenosis.
  • Discograms determine any damage to discs.
  • Electromyography (EMG) assesses nerve or muscle damage

Understanding your pain is the first step in relieving it. Once an accurate diagnosis is reached, your MedStar orthopedic physician can discuss with you the specifics of your condition and determine a treatment plan that will meet your individual needs.

Conditions That Cause Neck Pain

Brachial Plexus Injury: The brachial plexus is a group of nerves that transmit messages from the spine to the hand, shoulder and arm. Inflammation, a tumor, or a serious shoulder injury can damage the brachial plexus and cause arm and shoulder and neck pain as well as numbness, weakness, or paralysis in the arm

Degenerative Disc Disease: Flattening of the discs in between the vertebrae as a natural part of the aging process, causing the spaces separating the vertebrae to become smaller, which can affect the stability of the spine.

Facet Syndrome: This condition is caused by inflammation of  one or more of the facet joints. Facet joints are pairs joints running on either side and in between each of the vertebrae along the entire length of the spine. These structures allow for movement of the spine and provide stability. These joints can become inflamed and cause pain in that area. Physical therapy and other non-surgical treatments such as spinal injections are often used to rehabilitate the spine.

Muscle Strain or Spasm:: Pulled muscle or overworked muscle.

Osteoarthritis: Cartilage surrounding the spinal vertebrae gradually erodes, causing the bone to contact with the nerve.

Osteoporosis: Bone density is lost, causing vertebrae to weaken, fracture, or collapse, putting pressure on spinal nerves causing pain.

Treatment of Neck Pain

Neck pain treatment generally depends on how severe your pain is and the underlying cause. Common non-surgical treatment options may include:

  • Prescription and over-the-counter anti-inflammatory or pain medications
  • Injections of steroids or anti-inflammatory medications
  • Physical therapy, including applying heat or ice, massage, and strengthening exercises
  • Braces

If non-surgical treatment does not relieve your neck pain, you may need surgery. The orthopedic surgeons at MedStar Orthopaedic Institute have extensive training in the most advanced and innovative surgical procedures to treat neck pain, including minimally invasive neck surgery and motion sparing surgery.

Call Us Today

For more information or to schedule an appointment with a back, neck, and spine specialist, please call:

877-34-ORTHO