Ankle Surgery

 lookingatfootxray

Ankle Surgery

At MedStar Orthopaedic Institute, our teams integrate foot and ankle surgeons and therapists, all dedicated to eliminating the pain and limitations such disorders can cause. We believe in compassionate, focused care, and emphasize minimally invasive and arthroscopic procedures so patients have options for a faster recovery, a reduced risk of infection, and a quicker return to full function.

  • Ankle fusion is a surgical procedure that locks the ankle joint with screws, prohibiting the upward and downward motion of the ankle. It is a way to relieve pain in patients who have a worn out ankle joint due to arthritis or a traumatic injury. It is also an option for people with a severe deformity such as a flat foot, high-arched foot, or a club foot in which the ankle joint is also deformed, unstable, or damaged.
  • Ankle replacement is an available treatment for those suffering from arthritis in the ankle. Previously, the traditional treatment for severe arthritis in the ankle was to fuse together the bones of the ankle joint, restricting movement. In total ankle replacement, the diseased, worn-out ankle joint is removed and replaced with a prosthetic joint made of steel, chrome, and polyethylene. Lew Schon, MD discusses advancements in ankle replacments in the Science Borealis blog.
  • Fracture Care treatment is different for each individual and depends on the extent of the fracture. Treatment can range from a special shoe or cast to surgery for more severe fractures. Our foot and ankle specialists and surgeons may use plates, metal or absorbable screws, pins, staples, or tension bands to hold the bones in place. Physical therapy is the second stage of treatment for a fracture, following the cast removal or surgery.
  • Infected ankle replacement - If a total joint replacement becomes infected, the health of the joint and limb, as well as the overall health of the patient, become an immediate concern. Not all orthopedic specialists are trained to manage and treat infected total joints. At MedStar Health, our foot and ankle specialists and surgeons appropriately manage and aggressively treat infections. This often times requires removal of the total joint implant and a course of antibiotics followed by revision joint replacement. While this is unfortunate, it is critical for removing the bacteria from your system and maximizing your overall health and outcome.

  • Tendon Reconstruction is a treatment employed to repair tendon tears. For less severe tears, suturing may suffice. If you have an acute tear, your doctor will use tendon tissue grafts, taken either from elsewhere in the leg or from a tissue bank, to make the repair.
  • Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome Care Our foot and ankle specialists may implement conservative treatments such as rest, elevation, massage, anti-inflammatory medications, steroid injections, arch supports (orthotics), and/or better-fitting shoes. If conservative treatment does not provide results, your physician may suggest surgery during which an incision made in the ligament, located below the inside of the ankle, allowing room for the nerve to expand. If a cyst is impinging on the nerve, it can be removed.

Call Us Today

For more information or to schedule an appointment with a foot and ankle specialist, please call our scheduling line:

1-877-34ORTHO

Meet the Team

Locations

 

MedStar Good Samaritan Hospital
Foot and Ankle Specialists
5601 Loch Raven Boulevard
Baltimore, MD 21239

MedStar Union Memorial Hospital 
Foot and Ankle Specialists
3333 N. Calvert Street, Suite 400
Baltimore, MD 21218

Related Information

ACL Injury

basketball-feet-800x366

An ACL injury affects one of the four main ligaments that connect the femur (thighbone) to the tibia (shinbone).  The ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) is fibrous, like a rope and along with the other ligaments, holds the knee together, and provides rotational stability. 

An ACL injury usually happens during some kind of physical activity, sports or exercise. It results from a quick change of direction in forward motion, a twisting or pivoting motion, or sudden stops where the foot and lower leg are planted and the top part of the knee keeps moving forward, following the law of inertia, causing the ligament to tear either partially or completely. It is a very common sports injury both for competitive athletes and those involved in exercise or recreation sports.

Symptoms of an ACL injury include intense pain and swelling of the knee, loss of range of motion and weakness with weight-bearing on the leg. Sometimes a “pop” sound is heard when the ligament tears.

For a competitive athlete, a tear in the anterior cruciate ligament requires surgery to repair the tear, if they wish to return to their sport.  Non-competitive, yet active people may also choose to have the tear surgically repaired, so they can continue to be as active as they were before the tear. It is possible to rehabilitate the knee and not have surgery, but activity may be somewhat limited.

To repair of an ACL injury that involves a tear, the surgeon removes the damaged ACL and replaces it with a tissue graft, usually from either the patellar (knee) tendon or a hamstring tendon. 

Learn more about ACL surgery and repair.

For more information or to schedule an appointment with an knee specialist, please call our scheduling line:

877-34ORTHO (67846)

Meet the Team

Our Locations

MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center
9000 Franklin Square Drive
Baltimore, MD 21237

MedStar Good Samaritan Hospital
5601 Loch Raven Boulevard
Baltimore, MD 21239

MedStar Harbor Hospital
2900 S. Hanover Street
Baltimore, MD 21225

MedStar Union Memorial Hospital
3333 N. Calvert Street, Suite 400
Baltimore, MD 21218

Neck Pain

The spine program at MedStar Orthopaedic Institute is well-respected in the central Maryland and Washington regions for the diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of neck pain and spine disorders. Our program brings together a variety of skilled specialists with experience in a wide range of spinal conditions, including some of the most complex conditions seen in orthopedic medicine. Our multidisciplinary team includes orthopedic spine surgeons, neurosurgeons, physiatrists (rehabilitative medicine physicians), nursing staff, physical and occupational therapists, radiologists, and an interventional pain management team—and we put all our expertise to work for you, to relieve your neck pain and get you back to your active life. 

What is Neck Pain?

The spine consists of bones (vertebrae) separated by soft cushions (discs). Nerves that travel from the brain to the rest of the body all pass through the spine. When pressure from spinal vertebrae is applied to nerves, pain, numbness, tingling, or weakness can occur. These sensations are not always relegated to the back or spine as back pain; rather, they can occur in many areas of the body, depending on what nerves are pressed, where they originate in the spine, and where they travel to.

No matter how sharp, or how long it lasts, neck pain often limits our ability to feel active and productive. The top priority for anyone suffering from back pain is simply to eliminate the pain. Common causes of back pain include

  • Poor posture, especially while using a computer or watching television
  • Quickly twisting or moving your head
  • Sleeping in a bad position

Arm and leg pain can arise from neck issues or injuries. Experiencing serious pain in our arms and legs can make even the simplest tasks feel very difficult.

Pain is identified two different ways: acute and chronic. Most people with back or neck injuries suffer from acute pain, which lasts four to six weeks and can stop without medical treatment. Chronic pain lasts for more than three months and requires medical treatment. 

Neck Pain Diagnosis

When you arrive at a MedStar Orthopaedic Institute's facility with neck pain, our orthopedic teams will thoroughly review your medical history and symptoms and may perform a range of physical and laboratory examinations—all with the goal of making the most accurate diagnosis so we can give you the best treatment. The most common screenings to pinpoint the source of your neck pain or associated pain includes the following:

  • X-rays show the alignment of your bones and whether you have a degenerative joint disease or possible tumors.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computerized tomography (CT) scans can reveal herniated discs or problems with muscles, cartilage, ligaments, tendons, or blood vessels.
  • Myelography uses dye to show areas where your spinal cord may be getting pinched by the vertebrae in your back.
  • Bone scans detect bone tumors or compression fractures caused by osteoporosis.
  • Electrodiagnostic studies can confirm nerve compression caused by herniated discs or spinal stenosis.
  • Discograms determine any damage to discs.
  • Electromyography (EMG) assesses nerve or muscle damage

Understanding your neck pain is the first step in relieving it. Once an accurate diagnosis is reached, your MedStar orthopedic physician can discuss with you the specifics of your condition and determine a treatment plan that will meet your individual needs.

Conditions That Cause Neck Pain

Brachial Plexus Injury

The brachial plexus is a group of nerves that transmit messages from the spine to the hand, shoulder and arm. Inflammation, a tumor, or a serious shoulder injury can damage the brachial plexus and cause arm and shoulder and neck pain as well as numbness, weakness, or paralysis in the arm

Cervical Stenosis

Cervical stenosis is a condition in which the bones that make up the cervical spine tighten around the spinal cord, narrowing the cushioning space between them and putting too much pressure on the spinal cord. It can be caused by:

  • The natural wear and tear of aging
  • Narrowing since birth
  • Arthritis

Cervical stenosis causes a variety of uncomfortable symptoms, including:

  • Pain in the back, neck, legs, or bottom
  • Weakness, tingling or numbness in the shoulders, arm, and legs

Treatment

Treatment for cervical stenosis generally depends on the severity of the neck pain. If non-surgical treatments, including anti-inflammatory or pain medications, steroid injections, or physical therapy, do not relieve the pain, surgery may be an option. The orthopedic surgeons at MedStar Orthopaedic Institute are extensively trained in the most advanced and innovative surgical procedures to treat cervical stenosis.

  • Laminectomy, or decompression, removes the bones or ligaments that press on the nerves or spinal cord.
  • Cervical fusion - unites vertebrae together to help stabilize the spine.

Degenerative Disc Disease

Flattening of the discs in between the vertebrae as a natural part of the aging process, causing the spaces separating the vertebrae to become smaller, which can affect the stability of the spine.

Facet Syndrome

Facet Syndrome is inflammation of  one or more of the facet joints. Facet joints are pairs joints running on either side and in between each of the vertebrae along the entire length of the spine. These structures allow for movement of the spine and provide stability. These joints can become inflamed and cause pain in that area. Physical therapy and other non-surgical treatments such as spinal injections are often used to rehabilitate the spine.

Herniated Disc

Between your spinal bones (vertebrae) are pads of cartilage called discs. Natural use or strain can cause a disc to rupture (leak) or slip out of place (herniate). When a disc weakens, parts of it can shift and put pressure on a nerve or even the spinal cord. It may result in neck pain, numbness, tingling, or weakness. A variety of factors reduces the amount of water in the discs, making them weaker and more likely to get injured. These include:

  • Natural aging process
  • Being overweight
  • Picking up heavy objects
  • Smoking

Symptoms

  • Pain in the back or neck
  • Burning sensation
  • Arm and/or leg weakness
  • Numbness
  • Tingling, like your arm or leg "fell asleep"
  • Bladder control problems

Treatment

Most people suffering from neck pain from a herniated disc respond well to non-surgical treatment, which includes:

  • Rest
  • Taking prescription or over-the-counter anti-inflammatory or pain medications
  • Doing physical therapy, including applying heat or ice, massage, and exercises to strengthen the neck

If non-surgical treatment does not relieve your pain, you may need surgery. MedStar Health orthopedic surgeons will work with you to determine the least invasive and most effective surgical option, which include traditional open, minimally invasive, and endoscopic discectomy.

Muscle Strain or Spasm

Pulled muscle or overworked muscle.

Osteoarthritis

Cartilage surrounding the spinal vertebrae gradually erodes, causing the bone to contact with the nerve.

Osteoporosis

Bone density is lost, causing vertebrae to weaken, fracture, or collapse, putting pressure on spinal nerves causing pain.

Spinal Tumors

Tumors that grow on or near the bones of the spine or around the spinal cord can disrupt the line of communication between the spinal cord and the brain. Spinal tumors can originate in the spine, or spread to the spine from another part of the body. A spinal tumor can cause different kinds of symptoms, depending on where it is located and what type of tumor it is. Generally, spinal tumor symptoms can include:

  • Back pain
  • Strange feeling, either of coldness or numbness, in the legs or hands
  • Incontinence
  • Muscle discomfort, including weakness and cramping

Treatment

Treatment for a spinal tumor aims to remove or shrink the tumor and prevent it from damaging the spinal cord. The spinal surgeons at MedStar Health will work with you and your family to determine the most effective treatment options for you. In many cases, we recommend surgery to remove the as much of the tumor as possible. Our orthopedic surgeons have training and expertise in the most advanced microscopic and minimally invasive spinal surgeries. In other cases, we may recommend non-surgical treatment options, including:

  • Monitoring tumor growth
  • Medication, such as corticosteroids, to ease any swelling and inflammation
  • Radiation
  • Chemotherapy

Treatment of Neck Pain

Neck pain treatment generally depends on how severe your pain is and the underlying cause. Common non-surgical treatment options may include:

  • Prescription and over-the-counter anti-inflammatory or pain medications
  • Injections of steroids or anti-inflammatory medications
  • Physical therapy, including applying heat or ice, massage, and strengthening exercises
  • Braces

If non-surgical treatment does not relieve your neck pain, you may need surgery. The orthopedic surgeons at MedStar Orthopaedic Institute have extensive training in the most advanced and innovative surgical procedures to treat neck pain, including minimally invasive neck surgery and motion sparing surgery.

Call Us Today

For more information or to schedule an appointment with a back, neck and spine specialist, please call our scheduling line:

1-877-34ORTHO

 

Meet the Team

Our Locations

MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center
9000 Franklin Square Drive
Baltimore, MD 21237

MedStar Good Samaritan Hospital
5601 Loch Raven Boulevard
Baltimore, MD 21239

MedStar Harbor Hospital
2900 S. Hanover Street
Baltimore, MD 21225

MedStar Union Memorial Hospital
3333 N. Calvert Street, Suite 400
Baltimore, MD 21218

 

Knee Injury

MSH-Orthopaedic-HR

Knee injuries can happen for many reasons. They can be related to a fall, sports or exercise activity or due to some other type of accident.  Many knee injuries can be treated non-surgically with rest, ice, bracing, physical therapy and anti-inflammatory medications. Typically, knee injuries include bone fractures, dislocated joints, a soft tissue tear in one of  the ligaments that hold the knee joint together, or a tear in the cartilage that cushions in between the bones of the knee or a tear in one of the tendons that make up the knee joint.  

Symptoms of knee injuries include pain, swelling, the knee "giving out", not being able to move the knee or a "popping" sound at the time of injury.

In some cases, ligament tears can be treated non-surgically depending on the activity level of the patient.  For athletes, who suffer a knee injury involving tears to knee ligaments, most often surgery is needed in order for the athlete to return to their sport. 

 

For more information or to schedule an appointment with an knee specialist, please call our scheduling line:

877-34ORTHO (67846)

Meet the Team

Our Locations

MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center
9000 Franklin Square Drive
Baltimore, MD 21237

MedStar Good Samaritan Hospital
5601 Loch Raven Boulevard
Baltimore, MD 21239

MedStar Harbor Hospital
2900 S. Hanover Street
Baltimore, MD 21225

MedStar Union Memorial Hospital
3333 N. Calvert Street, Suite 400
Baltimore, MD 21218

Learn More:

  • Learn more about knee conditons at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

Knee Pain

Female patient at the doctor for a consultation on her ankle

The knee is a very complex structure of the body, responsible for bearing the full weight of the body when standing or moving.  Knee pain is a common problem which can be a result of issues with bone structure, knee ligaments, or cartilage. Some knee pain is the result of arthritis, injury, or chronic conditions such as gout or infection. Minor knee pain can usually be resolved with non-surgical treatments.  However, in cases of severe injury or severe arthritis, surgery to repair or replace the knee joint may be the best solution. 

Learn more about the common causes of knee pain:

For more information or to schedule an appointment with an knee specialist, please call our scheduling line:

877-34ORTHO (67846)

Meet the Team

Our Locations

MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center
9000 Franklin Square Drive
Baltimore, MD 21237

MedStar Good Samaritan Hospital
5601 Loch Raven Boulevard
Baltimore, MD 21239

MedStar Harbor Hospital
2900 S. Hanover Street
Baltimore, MD 21225

MedStar Union Memorial Hospital
3333 N. Calvert Street, Suite 400
Baltimore, MD 21218

Learn More:

  • Learn more about knee conditons at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

Hip Arthroscopy

Hip_Xray

Hip arthroscopy is a minimally invasive procedure that gives your doctor visualization of the internal anatomy of your hip joint and the surrounding muscles.  This means that instead of a large incision, which requires a painful, long recovery, your doctor can make three or four small incisions and determine if you need further treatment at that time. It is typically used for the treatment of hip conditions such as hip impingement.

Arthroscopy of the hip is technically more challenging than arthroscopy of other joints, such as the shoulder or knee, because of the anatomy of the ball and socket joint.  It is important to see a specialist with advanced training in this technique, such as Kenneth Tepper, MD.

Minimally Invasive Hip Arthroscopy: What to Expect

  1. Hip scopes are performed on an outpatient basis, which means you will go home that same day.
  2. During this procedure, you are on a special table which will pull, or distract the leg to allow room for instruments and the camera to be placed into the hip joint.
  3. A camera is placed into the hip joint through one small incision, and instruments to treat the underlying problem are placed though the other incisions.
  4. Excess bone can be shaved and removed, and the cartilage repaired.

Recovering from Arthroscopy of the Hip

Most patients find they need to use crutches two to six weeks after surgery. You can usually return to sports or high demand activity at approximately three to four months.

Call Us Today

877-34ORTHO

For more information or to schedule an appointment

Meet Our  Hip Arthroscopy Specialist

kenneth tepper

     Kenneth Tepper, MD

 Related Information

 

ACL Surgery (Anterior Cruciate Ligament)

acl surgery

ACL Surgery

ACL Surgery is a treatment option when the ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) is torn when the knee is pulled or twisted in an unnatural way. Injuries to the ACL are especially common in sports where side-to-side or pivoting movement of the knee is required; soccer, basketball, skiing, and football are frequent culprits. An injured ACL is associated with the following symptoms:

  • An audible pop or snapping upon injury
  • Immediate and sustained swelling in the knee
  • Instability in the knee that can cause it to give out
  • Inability to bear weight
  • Significant pain that does not diminish in the hours following the injury
  • A feeling of fullness in the knee

Elderly, less active patients may not require surgery following an ACL injury—if the overall stability of the knee is healthy and the patient has a low activity level, the physician may recommend non-surgical options. For young athletes, however, surgery is usually needed. The torn ligament must be replaced with a tissue graft, which will then form the base for the new ligament to grow on. Watch a video about sports related ACL surgery and injuries

Procedure

Many techniques are used to perform ACL reconstruction. Most are performed arthroscopically (a minimally invasive approach) through small puncture holes. A graft is placed in the location of your torn ligament and held in place by a fixation device such as a screw. This allows for early motion and rehab while the graft matures to a new functioning ACL. This knee surgery can be performed in about an hour, and patients go home the same day.

Recovery

Regrowth of the ACL graft can take a long time.. Physical therapy following the knee surgery will center on first returning motion to the joint and surrounding muscles before building strength to protect the new ligament. 

Call Us Today

877-34ORTHO (67846)

For more information or to schedule an appointment.

Meet the Team

Watch this Webcast About ACL Surgery and Injuries

Hip Replacement Surgery

hip replacement surgery

Hip Replacement Surgery

The goal of hip replacement surgery is to help relieve your pain and improve your quality of life. In a total hip replacement surgery, the painful parts of the damaged hip are replaced with artificial hip parts called a prosthesis, a device that substitutes or supplements a joint. The prosthesis consists of three components: a socket, ball, and stem. The outer shell of the socket is usually made of metal and the inner shell consists of plastic, or the entire socket may be plastic. When the metal ball is joined with the socket, the new hip allows for smooth, nearly frictionless movement.

  • Anterior Hip Replacement Surgery
    In an anterior hip replacement, the surgeon reaches the hip joint from the front of the hip, which means no muscle needs to be detached. This minimally invasive surgery allows for easier recovery and rapid return to normal functions. Anterior hip replacement surgery allows patients to immediately bend their hip freely and bear full weight when comfortable.
  • Rehabilitation
    The recovery process from total hip replacement will take time. Your orthopaedic surgeon will work with you to develop a rehabilitation plan that begins while you’re still in the hospital and continues until you feel completely healed. Typical recoveries include physical therapy exercises to regain your strength, pain management, and learning safe new ways to move and bend.

Hip Revision

Hip replacements are designed to last your entire life. However, replacements can wear out due to natural use over time, or to an infection that can develop in nearby tissues. Hip revisions remove old hip implants that may have become a problem, and replace them with new ones. This type of hip replacement surgery requires extraordinary skill to remedy the initial replacement—MedStar orthopaedic surgeons in both the central Maryland and Washington regions have the requisite expertise and surgical skill to perform such an important procedure.

Infected Total Joints

If a total joint replacement becomes infected, the health of the joint and limb, as well as the overall health of the patient, become an immediate concern.

Not all orthopaedic specialists are trained to manage and treat infected total joints. At MedStar Health, our orthopaedic surgeons appropriately manage and aggressively treat infections. This often times requires removal of the total joint implant and a course of antibiotics followed by revision joint replacement. While this is unfortunate, it is critical for removing the bacteria from your system and maximizing your overall health and outcome.

Call Us Today

For more information or to schedule an appointment with an hip replacement specialist:

877-34ORTHO(67846)

 

Meet the Team

Our Locations

MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center
9000 Franklin Square Drive
Baltimore, MD 21237

MedStar Good Samaritan Hospital
5601 Loch Raven Boulevard
Baltimore, MD 21239

MedStar Harbor Hospital
2900 S. Hanover Street
Baltimore, MD 21225

MedStar Union Memorial Hospital
3333 N. Calvert Street, Suite 400
Baltimore, MD 21218

Tennis Elbow

tennis elbow

Tennis Elbow and Tendonitis

The tissues that attach your bones to your muscles are called tendons. When your muscles flex, tendons spring into action, helping to move your bones. It is easy to injure the tendons in the arms and hands, since we use them so often. Tendinitis is an inflammation of a tendon that causes pain near a joint. It generally develops when an accident or injury cuts or damages the tendon.

Tennis elbow is the common term for one of the most common types of tendinitis. It is also called lateral epicondylitis and is an overuse injury caused by repeated movements of the wrist or arm. It causes an inflammation of the tendon fibers that attach the forearm muscles to the outside of the elbow. Pain occurs on the outside of the elbow and may radiate into your forearm and wrist. Your elbow may be stiff, swollen and tender. As the name suggests, tennis players, as well as golfers and other athletes, often suffer from this type of tendinitis. But tennis elbow can also affect you if you twist your wrist repeatedly on a regular basis, or if you type on a computer keyboard without proper support.

Although tendinitis and tennis elbow can be painful, the good news is that it rarely becomes chronic if caught early and treated properly. Treatment often involves a team of experts including primary care doctors, physical therapists, and in some cases surgeons. They all work together to provide you with customized, effective care. Learn about tennis elbow treatment options.

For pain relief, treatment options include:

  • Rest
  • Ice
  • Physical Therapy
  • Cortisone injections
  • Ceasing or changing your activity
  • Elbow supports
  • Anti-inflammatory medicines

If surgery becomes necessary, arthroscopic procedures are minimally invasive, provide tennis elbow sufferers with a relatively short recovery period, and can produce long-lasting results. Learn more about our team of Tennis Elbow specialists.

Call Us Today

For more information or to schedule an appointment:

877-34ORTHO (67846)

Meet the Team

Our Locations

MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center
for tennis elbow and other elbow conditions
9000 Franklin Square Drive
Baltimore, MD 21237

MedStar Good Samaritan Hospital 
for tennis elbow and other elbow conditions
5601 Loch Raven Boulevard
Baltimore, MD 21239

MedStar Harbor Hospital
for tennis elbow and other elbow conditions
2900 S. Hanover Street
Baltimore, MD 21225

MedStar Union Memorial Hospital 
for tennis elbow and other elbow conditions
3333 N. Calvert Street, Suite 400
Baltimore, MD 21218

Hip Impingement

Hip Pain

Hip pain is common in active individuals and athletes. The hip joint is prone to injury in both repetitive motion and high impact activities.

The surgeons of MedStar Orthopaedic Institute, who specialize in the treatment of hip pain, have a comprehensive and precise understanding of the causes of hip pain. While there are many causes, hip impingement is becoming an increasingly recognized problem in the athletic and highly active populations. The good news is that there are new and improved methods of treatment.

Hip Impingement

 MedStar Orthopaedic Institute’s surgeons commonly diagnose hip impingement, also known as femoral acetabular impingement or FAI, in young, active individuals who are performing repetitive hip movements. However, it is an overuse injury and can be present at all ages and activity levels. 

This condition is caused by abnormal contact between the ball of the femur and the socket. The abnormal contact can be a result of excessive bone around the socket, the femur, or a combination of both.

The excess bone creates a joint that is no longer spherical. This abnormal shape can cause injury to the cartilage as well as the labral soft tissue (cartilage). The damage caused may lead to increased pain and arthritis in the hip joint or hip labrum if left untreated.

Common Symptoms:

  • Pain in the groin with activity
  • Discomfort in the hip with sitting or standing
  • Catching or locking with hip motion
  • Decreased range of motion and discomfort with hip flexion and rotation

Diagnosis 

A diagnosis of hip impingement is based on a person’s symptoms and a thorough examination of his or her hips, spine, and lower extremities. An X-ray will be taken, and possibly a CAT or MRI scan.

Treatment 

Your doctor will probably want to begin your treatment conservatively before considering surgery.

  • Nonsurgical: If we determine that you have impingement that is due to an overuse injury, we will recommend rest and a modified exercise routine to reduce your pain.

Our specialists may recommend physical therapy to correct alignment abnormalities and strengthen the muscles around the hip. Steroid injections directly into the hip joint may decrease the inflammation and provide temporary, symptomatic relief.

  • Surgical: Surgery is recommended when impingement symptoms do not improve. In the past, hip impingement treatment required a large incision around the hip, dislocation of the hip joint, and contouring and repairing of the bone and labrum. This required hospital admission and a lengthy recovery. With recent advances in surgical technique, surgeons from MedStar Orthopaedic Institute can now treat it arthroscopically. 

Minimally invasive hip arthroscopy is performed through several very small incisions, rather than a large incision. The hip scope procedure is performed under general anesthesia, and a patient typically goes home the same day.

Meet Our Hip Impingement Specialist

kenneth tepper

 Kenneth Tepper, MD

 

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